6 – Related Arts & Derivatives of Judo

As referenced in Wikipedia - Excerpt Related arts and derivatives Kano Jigoro's Kodokan judo is the most popular and well-known style of judo, but is not the only one. The terms judo and jujutsu were quite interchangeable in the early years, so some of these forms of judo are still known as jujutsu or jiu-jitsu either for that reason, or simply to differentiate them from mainstream judo. From Kano's original style of judo, several related forms have evolved—some now widely considered to be distinct arts:
  • Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: In 1914, Mitsuyo Maeda introduced judo to Brazil. Maeda taught judo to Carlos Gracie (1902–1994) and others in Brazil. The Gracie family named their development of judo 'Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu'. This style emphasized the newaza aspects of judo and retains many of the kansetsu waza that were subsequently prohibited in competitive judo. Brazilan jiu-jitsu was popularized worldwide following its success in high profile mixed martial arts tournaments in the 1990s.[citation needed]
  • Kosen judo (高專柔道?): Sometimes erroneously described as a separate style of judo, Kosen Judo is a competition rules set of Kodokan Judo that was popularized in the early 20th century for use in Japanese Special High Schools Championships held at Kyoto Imperial University.[60] The word "Kosen" is an acronym of Koto Senmon Gakko (高等専門学校?, literally "Higher Professional School"). Kosen Judo's focus on newaza has drawn comparisons with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.
  • Russian judo: This distinctive style of judo was influenced by Sambo. It is represented by well-known coaches such as Alexander Retuinskih and Igor Yakimov, and mixed martial arts fighters such as Igor Zinoviev, Fedor Emelianenko and Karo Parisyan. In turn, Russian judo has influenced mainstream judo, with techniques such as the flying armbar being accepted into Kodokan judo.
  • Sambo (especially Sport Sambo): Vasili Oshchepkov was the first European judo black belt under Kano. Oshchepkov went on to contribute his knowledge of Judo as one of the three founders of Sambo, which also integrated various international and Soviet bloc wrestling styles and other combative techniques. Oshchepkov died during the political purges of 1937. In their History of Sambo, Brett Jacques and Scott Anderson wrote that in Russia "judo and SOMBO were considered to be the same thing"—albeit with a different uniform and some differences in the rules.[61]
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